How to Go from Wall Street Trader to Serial Entrepreneur

serial-entrepreneur-goldfish

In the early 2000s Maria Baum WG’94 had the “Nirvana job” of traders, she said. She was a global macro proprietary trader at Lehman Brothers, “which means I could basically trade any instrument, anywhere in the world, really without asking anybody, and with a very generous limit.” She also had three children (she now has four).

One morning as she rushed to work, she had a revelation. “It was like 5 o’clock in the morning, pitch black out, I had on a suit and heels, and a breast pump over my shoulder. I was leaving for work because I ran an international book and had to get in very early. And I thought, ‘Why am I doing this? This isn’t how I want to spend my life now.’” Read more How to Go from Wall Street Trader to Serial Entrepreneur

A Tale of Transformation

By Mike Kijewski LPS’10/WG’12, Founder of Gamma Basics

After undergrad, I was teaching AP chemistry and physics to suburban Philadelphia seniors.  My young, undergraduate vision included inspiring them to look at the world in an inquisitive and analytical way and to strive for personal evolution.  After three years of trying to help them discover their own dreams, I understood that I was failing at my own teaching.  While I loved my experiences inside the classroom, I realized that I wanted a career that was more entrepreneurial while still helping to improve the lives of those around me.

Mike used WVA funds to attend the 2011 American Association of Physicists in Medicine converence in Vancouver. At that show, they met their second largest customer.
Mike used WVA funds to attend the 2011 American Association of Physicists in Medicine converence in Vancouver. At that show, they met their second largest customer.

Read more A Tale of Transformation

Somewhere above Europe

By Jon Cooper WG’09/CAS’03, Founder of Life.io

Here’s where I am right now: somewhere above Europe, en-route from Dubai, a screen reads 10h 24m until touchdown in JFK. Here’s what’s going through my head:

Won’t be home until midnight. Must be fresh and ready to go to by 6 am. Duty free had a great toy selection. Thank God. It’s my son’s birthday. He will be 4. What? He’ll be 4!? Wow. Time is flying. This also means Life.io will be 4 soon. When did this all happen? Crazy.

This is my tenth JFK/Dubai leg in under a year, and my mind is racing. There are so many things to prep, deliver, adjust (no, enhance. Enhance sounds better…). With the stress, jet lag and three hours sleep, it feels like I’m caught somewhere between a good dream and an anxiety dream.

airplane wing 600 x 450 Read more Somewhere above Europe

The Longest Running Startup in the History of Startups

By Korin Korman WG’92, Founder of 3000BC

A mentor of mine once called 3000BC “the longest running startup in the history of startups.” At the time, I laughed, but I wasn’t sure whether to celebrate this title, or crawl into my closet, assume the fetal position, and give up. I decided to proudly wear it as my official badge—and today, my startup is still running, and, as my mentor put it, it’s still a startup.

The 3000BC storefront
The 3000BC storefront

Read more The Longest Running Startup in the History of Startups

From Submarine Officer to Social Entrepreneur

By Steve Weiner WG’16, Navy Veteran and Co-Founder of VetTechTrek

I didn’t join the military with a plan to get out.

Like most 18 year olds, I hadn’t quite mapped out a plan for my life and I certainly didn’t predict that I would eventually earn my MBA from Wharton. Becoming a social entrepreneur and launching a foundation focused on helping veterans advance their careers after their service was unimaginable.

Steve in his Navy days.
Steve in his Navy days.

Read more From Submarine Officer to Social Entrepreneur

YouthHack Philly Startup Tour

By Tiffany Chang W’19

Growing up in the Kaka’ako neighborhood in my hometown of Honolulu, Hawaii, I became exposed to the budding startup culture that trickled across the Pacific from the Bay Area. What I found most intriguing about this culture was its ability to define a problem in society and creatively find a solution to it. Back home, I joined a fellows group called the Center for Tomorrow’s Leaders, which helped me gain the tools to become a leader and cofound Hawaii’s first student coworking space, The Canvas. Upon arriving at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School, I knew I wanted to take my ideas to a whole new level. Inside the classroom, Wharton allows me to study across a wide variety of fields with the best resources. Outside the classroom, I joined clubs and programs like YouthHack FreshStart, which has given me opportunities and resources to transform my ideas into reality.

YoutHack Philly with Curalate founder Apu Gupta WG'05 at the Curalate office.
YoutHack Philly with Curalate founder Apu Gupta WG’05 at the Curalate office.

Read more YouthHack Philly Startup Tour

A Digital Health Cure for Insurance Marketing

By Matthew Brodsky, Editor, Wharton Magazine

Editor’s note: This post was previously published on the Wharton Magazine blog

Sally Poblete WG’00 has been at the intersection of health care and entrepreneurship her entire career. For a while, though, the ratio had been more to the health care side. But she always knew she would get back to entrepreneurship. Now she has.

SallyPobleteLEAD sm Read more A Digital Health Cure for Insurance Marketing

Get a ‘GRIP’ on Wharton’s Alumni Network

By Bennett Sultan W’17

Editor’s note: This post originally appeared on the Wharton Magazine blog, and the original version of this post first appeared on Wharton Undergraduate Program’s Student Voices.

How many Wharton alumni can you spot on the streets of the “Silicon Valley of India,” Bangalore? Photo credit: Wikimedia Commons.
How many Wharton alumni can you spot on the streets of the “Silicon Valley of India,” Bangalore? Photo credit: Wikimedia Commons.

Read more Get a ‘GRIP’ on Wharton’s Alumni Network

6 Ingredients for Business Staying Power

Editor’s note: This post originally appeared on the Wharton Magazine blog

By Matthew Brodsky, Editor, Wharton Magazine

Staying power. That’s the key phrase for entrepreneurs. Unicorns and deca-unicorns may be what wide-eyed students, business editors and investors like to hear about. Staying power, however, is the process by which most startups become viable, long-term businesses. Ask Victoria Taylor WG’86 about her staying power and her company’s 18-year trajectory.

“It’s been brutal,” she will tell you.

The brining blend that started a trend.
The brining blend that started a trend.

Read more 6 Ingredients for Business Staying Power