Will Habos WG’16 at OnPACE Energy Solutions, Del Mar, CA

2015-2016 Ambassadors of Entrepreneurship

Sutton Entrepreneurial Intern Fellow

Will
Habos
September
15,
2015
Summer
Reflection
Paper
Wharton
Entrepreneurship
• How
did
you
find
the
position?

Personal
network
• What
was
your
motivation
for
working
at
a
start-­‐up
this
summer?

Experience
to
leverage
for
own
start-­‐up
• What
advice
would
you
give
to
students
interested
in
working
at
a
start-­‐up
this
summer?

See
below
There
are
start-­‐ups
and
then
there
are
start-­‐ups.
When
people
ask
me
what
I
did
this
summer,
I
tell
them
that
I
worked
at
a
start-­‐up.
When
I
tell
them
that,
I
can
immediately
see
their
eyes
widen
and
their
prefrontal
cortexes
lighting
up
like
a
kaleidoscope.
I
can
almost
see
the
images
floating
in
their
minds
of
all-­‐you-­‐can-­‐
eat-­‐whenever-­‐you-­‐can-­‐eat
food
stations,
video
game
breaks,
pool
tables,
kegerators,
and
colorful
non-­‐traditional
chairs
scattered
around
an
open-­‐floor
concept
office.
I
can
almost
predict
the
types
of
questions
they
want
to
ask,
knowing
quite
well
they
were
more
interested
in
hearing
about
the
lifestyle
than
what
I
actually
did
or
where
I
actually
worked.
More
than
anything,
they
want
to
hear
that
my
life
was
all
the
media
built
it
up
to
be…
and
so
did
I.
The
start-­‐up
I
worked
at
this
summer
was
as
early-­‐stage
as
a
company
could
possibly
get.
By
early,
I
mean
that
I
was
the
third
person
on
the
team.
By
early,
I
mean
that
I
drove
to
the
CEO’s
house
everyday
and
worked
directly
across
from
him
in
his
small
home
office.
By
early,
I
mean
that
their
business
model
seemed
to
change
on
a
daily
basis
as
new
developments
in
the
market
or
competitors
surfaced.
By
early,
I
mean
pre-­‐any-­‐meaningful-­‐
round-­‐of-­‐funding
early.
By
early…
I
mean
that
life
was
far
from
“Airbnbeautiful”,
“Snapchaterrific

and
“Ubertastic”
as
possible.
When
I
tell
people
about
my
summer,
I
try
to
play
it
off
as
being
really
“chill”.
(I
lived
in
San
Diego
after
all
and
worked
near
the
beach.)
I
tell
people
of
the
great
experience
I
received
working
for
such
an
early-­‐stage
start-­‐up
and
seeing
how
very
early-­‐stage
start-­‐ups
have
to
adapt,
and
constantly
pivot
and
change
strategies.
However,
while
it’s
true
that
it
was
“chill”
and
a
“great
experience”
from
that
regard,
those
words
completely
mask
the
founder’s
start-­‐up
experience
I
witnessed
first
hand.
While
working
at
the
start-­‐up,
I
witnessed
the
emotional
rollercoaster
the
founder
went
through
trying
to
get
the
business
off
the
ground.
There
were
days
when
it
seemed
like
nothing
could
bring
him
down.
The
stars
seemed
to
be
aligning
and
the
business
seemed
to
be
gaining
traction.
Those
were
good
days.
We’d
end
work
early,
grab
a
beer
and
a
couple
fish
tacos,
and
let
the
daydreaming
commence.
Then
there
were
bad
days,
when
something
wasn’t
going
as
planned
or
the
strategic
direction
came
into
question.
I
could
always
tell
if
it
was
a
bad
day.
The
founder
seemed
to
recede
into
himself.
He
would
sit
in
the
room,
but
remain
completely
silent,
closed
off
to
any
new
ideas
presented
that
day.
It
was
as
if
he
was
ready
to
raise
the
proverbial
white
flag…
but
he
didn’t.
He
actually
never
did,
no
matter
how
many
bad
days
he
had.
Will
Habos
September
15,
2015
Summer
Reflection
Paper
Wharton
Entrepreneurship
That’s
the
single
greatest
lesson
I
learned
over
the
summer.
If
you
want
to
start
a
company,
you
cannot
let
fear
get
in
the
way.
You
cannot
let
any
bump
or
detour
in
the
road
prevent
you
from
completing
the
journey
you
started,
especially
when
you’ve
just
begun.
It’s
very
easy
to
find
reasons
to
quit
and
do
what’s
comfortable,
and
I’ve
found
that
as
you
get
further
down
the
path
finding
reasons
just
seems
to
get
easier
and
easier.
You’ll
run
head
on
into
doubters,
second-­‐guessers,
and
skeptics,
and
they
all
come
in
different
shapes,
sizes,
and
forms.
Yet,
the
biggest
and
most
dangerous
doubter
of
them
will
always
come
from
within.
On
bad
days,
you
will
doubt
everything
that
you
do
and
it’ll
make
raising
that
white
flag
that
much
easier.
However,
there
will
always
be
bad
days…
That’s
what
being
an
entrepreneur
is
all
about.
The
question
is:
are
you
willing
to
see
through
the
bad
days
to
get
to
the
good?